This course explores the relationship between leadership and ethics. Beyond just an examination of ethical systems and ethical issues, this course attempts to understand the ways in which ethics is central to the very act and process of leadership. In addition, this course reflects the commitment of the MSLS Program to seek ways of finding meaningful application of course content to the personal and professional lives of its students. To accomplish this, several methods and sources of inquiry will be used.
First of all, the content of the course will involve exposure to some of the major historical ethical systems as well as principles derived from a biblical model of ethics that can inform the development of a personal ethical perspective. Secondly, students will learn how to analyze organizational/personal ethical dilemmas by using various ethical decision-making models. Thirdly, students will investigate the extent to which the leadership process, particularly the leader-follower relationship, includes a variety of ethical issues and what the implications of those ethical issues are in terms of leadership character, attitudes and behaviors.
As part of this course process, students will re-examine various leadership models previously studied to determine their "congruence” with ethical behaviors. An important emphasis is the understanding and application of biblical principles of leadership ethics to personal and organizational decision-making. As a result, students have the opportunity to develop more effective ethical decision-making skills.

Leaders in church and nonprofit organizations face unique challenges not faced by for-profit companies. Most not-for-profit groups do not have services or products that they create, thus they are funded through donations and grants. Those that do provide services usually provide them for constituencies that cannot afford to pay the full cost or value of the services. In addition, not-for-profits have a significant volunteer base that donates time and expertise toward the cause of the organization. 

What’s more, there are unique leadership demands and requirements for nonprofit or church leaders. It is significant that Peter F. Drucker, the father of modern management studies, devoted his last professional years to addressing the needs and stressing the importance of social sector leaders in the modern economy. Not only are the requirements for social sector leaders unique, but the expectations from followers and staff alike, coupled with the biblical leadership principles expected in faith-based organizations, require special attention from these leaders. 

In this course, we will look at the concepts studied in the MSLS program as they pertain to the nonprofit world, including churches. This course will provide students with an opportunity to consider how they would apply what they have learned within their social sector or religious setting. Emphasis is placed on identifying and developing the unique leadership skills so vital to the success of any nonprofit entity.

This course provides a framework for the systematic approach to project implementation and discusses case studies, tools, and articles in order to provide applied examples and insight from the field. Students will use and produce various project management tools and artifacts in order to gain a deeper understanding of the actual Project Management environment found in the workplace.
This course provides a framework for the systematic approach to project implementation and discusses case studies, tools, and articles in order to provide applied examples and insight from the field. Students will use and produce various project management tools and artifacts in order to gain a deeper understanding of the actual Project Management environment found in the workplace.